University Bulletin 2017-2018

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Computing (Ph.D.)

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMPUTING

The interdisciplinary Doctor of Philosophy degree in Computing integrates coursework and research projects from three related disciplines: computer science, information systems, and information technology. The program emphasizes advanced discovery and the development of solutions to research-focused problems in the areas of cyber assurance, risk assessment, forensics, and data analytics.  Ph.D. graduates are eligible for research positions in academia, industry, and government.

The Ph.D. degree is awarded to candidates who have demonstrated a capacity for original research, have made a meaningful contribution to knowledge in the computing discipline, and have successfully defended a dissertation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

Applicants are normally admitted in the fall semester and are encouraged to complete the admissions application prior to February 1. In addition to the general admission requirements of the USA Graduate School, admission requirements for the Computing Ph.D. program are:

1.  A statement of purpose indicating the student’s personal goals and research interests. Because prospective students are matched with a faculty mentor, competitive applications align with the research areas of School of Computing graduate faculty.
2.  Three letters of recommendation from persons able to speak directly to the applicant’s ability to engage in advanced discovery and contribute new knowledge to the discipline.
3.  Curriculum vita
4.  An official transcript from each college or university attended.
5.  A baccalaureate or graduate degree in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology or a closely related field. A graduate degree is not required for admission.
6.  An undergraduate minimum GPA of 3.3 overall or a graduate minimum GPA of 3.5 overall (4 point scale).
7.  Official scores for the Graduate Records Examination (GRE) including the AW portion.
8.  For international students, an official TOEFL or IELTS score.
9.  A completed application for admission to the Graduate School

Admission is competitive and the decision is based on a review of all submitted admission materials. A personal interview may be requested.  Applicants are encouraged to submitted samples of prior work. All admissions materials should be sent to the Office of Admissions, 2500 Meisler Hall, Mobile Alabama 36688.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

To qualify for the Ph.D. in Computing, a minimum of 72 semester hours of approved graduate credit is required and the following program of study must be completed with a grade of “B” or better in all course work.

Required Course Work (18 hours)
 CIS 612  Cybersecurity  3 hrs    
 CIS 626 Tools for Analyzing
Big Data
 3 hrs    
 ISC 629  Computing Ecosystems  3 hrs    
 ISC 673 Digital Investigations – Theory and Practice  3 hrs    
 IST 675  Advanced Topics in Information Systems  3 hrs    
 ISC 686 Advanced Topics in
Risk Analysis 
 3 hrs    

Electives (24 hours)

Student will complete 24 semester hours of 500-level or higher approved graduate coursework. A maximum of 12 semester hours of CIS 694 Directed Study may be counted towards fulfilling the electives requirement.

Dissertation (30 hours)

A primary educational objective of the Ph.D. program is for students to develop the ability to conduct advanced research and contribute new knowledge to the discipline. To that end, the student will complete 30 hours of CIS 799 Dissertation.

Academic Standards

Student must maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA in order to be in good standing. Failure to maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA will result in the student being placed on academic probation. The School of Computing Director of Graduate Programs may recommend dismissal of a student who does not maintain good academic standing or is not making sufficient progress.

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

Graduate assistantships are available annually on a competitive basis. The application deadline is July 1. Information regarding assistantships is available on the School of Computing website.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

Doctoral students must pass a comprehensive examination. The format of the examination will be determined by the comprehensive examination committee. Normally the examination is based on the required coursework. Failure to pass the comprehensive examination within three attempts will result in dismissal from the program.

CANDIDACY

A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon successful completion of a comprehensive examination. Candidacy indicates the student has completed the required coursework and is eligible to begin the dissertation research project.

DISSERTATION HOURS AND DEFENSE

Doctoral candidacy is required to enroll in CIS 799 Dissertation. At the discretion of the Director of Graduate programs, directed study credit constituting preliminary preparation for the dissertation study may be substituted for CIS 799. While only 30 hours of CIS 799 may be counted toward the degree, a student must continuously enroll in at least 1 credit hour of dissertation during the fall and spring semesters until the dissertation is successfully defended. Failure to enroll continuously without the written approval of the Director of the Graduate program may lead to dismissal from the program.

A doctoral candidate must successfully defend a dissertation prospectus. The final oral defense of the dissertation is scheduled after the dissertation study has been completed and prepared in written form. Revisions to the written dissertation may be required for final approval by the dissertation committee and as a result of a review by the Graduate School.

TRANSFER CREDIT

A maximum of 24 semester hours of graduate credit earned at an approved graduate school may be counted toward the Ph.D. program. Transfer credit may be approved after the completion of nine (9) semester hours of credit at the University of South Alabama. Transfer credit must be approved by the School of Computing Director of Graduate programs with the recommendation of the student’s advisor.

TIME LIMIT

After reaching candidacy, a student has a maximum of 3 years to complete the dissertation. A student may apply to the Director of Graduate programs for an extension to complete the degree.

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

First Year
Fall Semester
Course Description Course Number                    Credit Hours                   
  Digital Investigations ISC 673 3
  Cybersecurity CSC 612 3
  Comp Ecosystems ISC 629 3
    Elective 3
      12
First Year
Spring Semester
Course Description         Course Number                         Credit Hours                         
  Risk Analysis ISC 686 3
  Advanced Big Data CSC 626 3
  Information Systems ISC 675 3
  Elective Elective 3
      12
Second Year
Fall Semester              
Course Description                Course Number                                     Credit Hours                                    
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Elective Elective 3
  Elective Elective 3
      12
Second Year
Spring Semester  
Course Description          Course Number                            Credit Hours                           
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Elective Elective 3
  Elective Elective 3
      12
Third Year
Fall Semester
Course Description                      Course Number                                           Credit Hours                   
  Elective Elective 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
      12
Third Year
Spring Semester 
Course Description           Course Numbers                                 Credit Hours                   
  Elective Elective 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
  Dissertation CIS 799 3
      12
Doctor of Philosophy Program in Computing  
Associate Professor & Computer Science Coordinator Dr. Tom Johnsten

Computer Science is a discipline that involves the understanding and design of computers and computational processes. In its most general form, it is concerned with the understanding of information transfer and transformation. Particular interest is placed on making processes efficient and endowing them with some form of intelligence. The discipline includes both advancing the fundamental understanding of algorithms and information processes in general, as well as the practical design of efficient, reliable software to meet given specifications. Courses offer students the opportunity to explore current trends in computing such as: game development, robotics, graphics, and data mining.