Colloquium Schedule

Date Speaker

 

Thursday

March 8, 2018

4:00 PM

MSPB (formerly ILB)

Room 250

 


Dr. Mathew Muether

Assistant Professor
Wichita State University


Neutrino Interaction Results from the NOvA Neutrino Experiment

Precisely measuring neutrino properties, such as mass and flavor mixing, is the focus of a set of current and future international experimental efforts. In order to optimize these measurements, the nature of neutrino-nucleus interactions must be well established in relevant energy ranges. This talk will survey the physics of neutrino-nucleus interactions and present recent results from the NOvA neutrino experiment.

 

Thursday

November 30, 2017

4:00 PM

MSPB (formerly ILB)

Room 250

 


Dr. Leon Mualem

Senior Research Scientist
California Institute of Technology


Results from the NOvA Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

The NOvA experiment detects neutrinos sent from Fermilab, near Chicago, to Northern Minnesota. The detector is one of the largest neutrino detectors, observing neutrinos beamed from over 800km away. I will describe the technology of the detectors and recent results from the first 2 years of operation, and what is yet to come.

 

Thursday

September 28, 2017

4:00 PM

MSPB (formerly ILB)

Room 250

 


Dr. Douglas A. Glenzinski

Mu2e Spokesperson
Fermi National Accelerator Lab


A Rare Opportunity — the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

The muon, a heavy cousin of the electron, was discovered in 1936. Since that time they have only ever been observed to do one of two things: 1) interact with a nucleus, or 2) decay into an electron and two neutrinos. But a new experiment at Fermilab - the Mu2e experiment - is going to look for a third thing: a muon interacting with a nucleus to produce an electron and nothing else. This is a process that's predicted to occur very very rarely, maybe once every quadrillion muon decays, (or less!). But this very rare decay may hold the key to understanding physics at its most fundamental level. The Mu2e experiment is an ambitious endeavor whose goal is to observe this very rare decay for the first time - a discovery that could help reveal a new paradigm of particle physics.

 

Thursday

September 14, 2017

2:30 PM

ILB Room 250

 


Lindsay Hutcherson

Kansas State University REU
Physics Student - University of South Alabama


Design and Construction of an Efficient Atomization Tool for Strong Field Science at the Nanoscale

In order to better understand ultrafast light interaction with nanoparticles (such as Coulomb explosion), we must choose a light source capable of resolving images at the nanoscale. Free electron lasers (such as the Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg at DESY) have the capability to produce femtosecond infrared (50 fs) and x-ray (10-100 fs) pulses to perform pump-probe experiments at the nanoscale. A prior beamtime successfully used SiO2 nanoparticles to study Coulomb explosions at the nanoscale, but metallic nanoparticles prove a challenge for future experiments. These fragile nanoparticles require gentle handling in order to prevent clustering, which means a single-nanoparticle delivery system is a key factor for future studies. Commercial atomizers use the Bernoulli Effect to pull a large amount of nanoparticle solution into a cavity where a jet of pressured gas can blast away droplets to create an aerosol. Unfortunately, this violent process has a tendency to strip the ligand shell from more fragile, metallic nanoparticles, as well as produces aerosol with high waste in return. Over a 10 week period, we tested a new design for the atomizer, which implemented a double tube design to allow liquid to flow onto the gas jet and produce just enough aerosol to match the liquid provided, eliminating high waste production and leading to a gentle process that would not threaten the fragile ligand shell of metallic nanoparticles.


Kevin Ingles

Fermilab SIST
Physics Student - University of South Alabama


Monte Carlo Investigation of Muons in a Liquid-Argon TPC

The DUNE Far Detector is a Liquid-Argon TPC that resides at the 4850 ft level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This detector allows for both the visualization and the measurement of charged particle energy deposition. Cosmic rays that penetrate down to the detector have a wide energy range. This study focuses on momenta between 0.2 GeV to 1000 GeV. The detector response to the muons is simulated using GEANT4. Mean energy loss and most probable energy loss are presented as a function of momentum. Preliminary results are given that will help develop an algorithm that determines energies from energy deposition of high-energy muons.

 

Thursday

September 7, 2017

4:00 PM

ILB Room 250

 


Dr. Peter Bernath

Professor of Physics
Old Dominion University


Molecular Astronomy: Cool Stars and Exoplanets

The spectra of “cool” astronomical objects such as low mass stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets are dominated by molecular absorption features. Of particular interest are methane, water, ammonia and diatomic hydrides at high temperatures. An overview of this area of molecular astronomy will be presented from a spectroscopic perspective. The talk will include emission and absorption laboratory measurements of hot molecules by Fourier transform spectroscopy related to exoplanets. Comparisons with the latest theoretical predictions will be presented.

Colloquium Schedule Archive