Summer and Fall 2018 Courses

 

Student Studying
 

 

MAYMESTER

GS 290 #MeToo, Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protests Through the Lens of Race, Genders, and Sexuality (Betty Trout-Kelly)
Fully Online Course. The velocity of national protests fighting for human rights across the constitutional continuum of justice, dignity, and safety have evolved into a epidemic throughout American infrastructures. This course will plunge into the #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, and Stay Woke Movements. Significant visibility for how social constructs of gender, race, and sexuality intersect with these protesters' outcries will be examined. Further considerations will be given to exposing those accused of sexual violence on various fronts as well as existing allegations of wrongful deaths will be a part of the course curriculum. Additionally, political instruments that are being used to effectively penetrate these existing cultures of power and dominance will also be researched and discussed.

SUMMER

GS 492/CLA 492/LG 490 Sex in Toga (Kevin Tsai)
This course will examine gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome. What was family life like? How was homosexuality idealized? Could the practice of pleasure be related to the sense of self? Is romantic love "natural" or did it arise only under certain cultural conditions? What lessons can we learn to empower ourselves today? We will attempt to answer these questions and more by examining texts ranging from philosophy (Plato's Symposium & Phaedrus) to law, history, and adventure novels. Comparison with ancient China will help us place sexuality in a wider context.

CA 315 Gender & Communication (April Dupree-Taylor)
This online course is a survey of research and theory concerning the differences in communication between men and women and the effects and functions of communication between men and women.

CJ 372 Gender & Criminal Justice (Corina Schulze)
This course utilizes gender as a conceptual construct in studying actors and the institutional processes in the criminal justice system. Women's roles as criminals, crime victims, and law enforcement officials will be examined.

EH 490 Jane Austen, Secret Radical? (John Halbrooks)
This course takes its title from Helena Kelly's recent book (question mark added.) In this course, we will consider Kelly's claims about Austen's politics, as well as her claim that Austenian film adaptations have entirely whitewashed the novels' radicalism. We will study two of Austen's novels (Pride and Prejudice and Emma), as well as film adaptations. Furthermore, each student will present on another Austen adaptation of their choosing in the last days of the course.

HS 463 Human Sexuality & Health Education (Shelley Holden)
This online course will offer an exploration of human sexuality with implications for health education.

IST 320 Cultural Competency (Joycelyn Finley-Hervey)
This online course is an interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to interactions between diverse groups in teams, communities, and organizations. Reviews research from a variety of disciplines, introduces the history and law of equal opportunity in the U.S., and examines the costs and benefits of diversity. Topics include prejudice, stereotyping, affirmative action, barriers to mobility, discrimination, marginalization, mentoring, cooperative teamwork, and international issues. 


SY 220 Marriage and the Family (Gloria Palileo)
Fully Online. The organization, function, and present status of the family, primarily in the United States. Problems of mate selection, marital adjustment, and parent-child relations treated on the basis of recent and current social change.

FALL

GS 290- 801 Understanding Our World: American Social and Cultural Life (Betty Trout-Kelly)
This fully online course will examine various historical and contemporary aspects of American social and cultural life with an emphasis on diversity and an examination of the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, ability and other identifiers.

GS 290-802 Black Women & Activism (Betty Trout-Kelly)
This online course will examine black women as agents and activists for change and will cover such topics as the African Diaspora, slave culture, Black Nationalism from womanist and feminist perspectives and the constructions and realities of Black womanhood. This course will incorporate perspectives from several disciplines including history, gender studies, psychology and sociology.

GS 490/PHL 490 Future Sex/Love: Science Fiction and Gender (Kristina Busse) Science fiction allows us to imagine worlds, beings, relationships, and technologies that do not exist, some impossible, others just an invention or social struggle away. Its social commentaries range from bitter satires that extrapolate current social ills to utopian futures that imagine alternate ways of being. From Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and N.K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season, women writers have used speculative fiction to explore their real and potential lives; sexuality and reproductive issues; genders and sexualities; as well as alternate families and social structures. This class will engage with fiction and media of possible futures, focusing on gender and sexuality within the context of race, class, nationality, and/or disability. Whether as extrapolations of the present or refutations of the status quo, these works allow us to discuss our reality as distorted (and clarified) through the prism of futurist imagination.

AFR 101 Introduction to African-American Studies (Kern Jackson)
An interdisciplinary investigation of the origins, experiences, conditions, accomplishments and contributions of people of African ancestry in the United States.

ARH 480 Women in Art (Elizabeth Rivenbark)
A study of women throughout art history as both the subject and the creator of art. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Art History above the 200 level. An exception regarding the Prereq may be made for GS Minors—please contact Dr. Rivenbark)

CJ 372 Gender & Criminal Justice (Corina Schulze)


This course utilizes gender as a conceptual construct in studying actors and the institutional processes in the criminal justice system. Women's roles as criminals, crime victims, and law enforcement officials will be examined.

EDF 300 Gender & International Development (Laureen Fregeau)

This course introduces concepts in gender, international development and global education and critique gender issues in developing nations and international efforts to address these concerns from the 1970's to the present with particular emphasis on the context of women. Includes formal and nonformal education of women, cultural differences (reproduction, marriage, male/female hierarchies) affecting life opportunities, rural vs. urban issues, politics, social class influences, international movements, and organizations and efforts to empower girls and women to advance their lives within the context of gendered social roles. Will look al gender in development through various lenses including the Gender Equality Continuum. Students will interact directly with individuals in the field via videoconferencing and other modes of electronic communication.  Assessment will center on a guided project and service experience specific to individual student interests.

GRN 272 Gender & Aging (Sandra House)
This online course examines the dynamics of gender and aging within society from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will be introduced to controversies in gender over the life course. These include, but are not limited to, definitions and cultural boundaries, gender in childhood, gender and relationships, gender in education and the workplace, gender and sexuality, as well as gender in late life.

IST 320 Cultural Competency (Joycelyn Finley-Hervey)
This online course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to interactions between diverse groups in teams, communities, and organizations. Reviews research from a variety of disciplines, introduces the history and law of equal opportunity in the U.S., and examines the costs and benefits of diversity. Topics include prejudice, stereotyping, affirmative action, barriers to mobility, discrimination, marginalization, mentoring, cooperative teamwork, and international issues. 


PSC 340 Race, Gender & Politics (Corina Schulze)
This course is designed to provide students with a critical examination of race and gender in the political system. From the founding to the present, politics and government reflect ideological judgments about who gets what, when, and how. As such, government has legitimized only certain individuals as political actors, certain identities as politically relevant, certain relationships as important, and certain practices as the means by which one might change political status. This course looks at the interlinked social processes that make gender and race in the United States. How have social relations like colonization, slavery, civil rights, and migration shaped social institutions like the courts, media, education, and health care? How have people fought back against gender and racial subordination? We examine particular historical contexts and contemporary issues to answer these questions. Thus, the entire course asks you to reflect on the ethics of building a society that is free of racial and gender discrimination. In doing, so we come to realize that concepts of race and gender change over time and that people do not experience their racial and gender identities apart from each other. Furthermore, one’s race and gender also send out messages about one’s sexuality and economic class.

SY 200 Social Factors in Sexual Behavior (Marc Matre)
An analysis of social patterns in sexual behavior including theories of sexuality and gender, gender similarities and differences in sexual behavior, sexual orientation, sexual violence, teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

SY 220 Marriage & the Family (Susan Deloach; Hosik Min)
The organization, function, and present status of the family, primarily in the United States. Problems of mate selection, marital adjustment, and parent-child relations treated on the basis of recent and current social change.

SY 428 Gender & Society (Hosik Min)
This course examines gender roles and inequality in contemporary Western societies in cross-cultural and historical context.