English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2017 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Intro to Literary Study - EH 300 | Steve Trout
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

Required of all English majors, this course covers the essentials of literary research and critical writing. It is designed to establish a foundation for more advanced study in 400-level courses and beyond. The readings, haphazardly drawn from a list of my favorite works, include H.G. Wells's The Time Machine, Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim, Willa Cather's The Professor's House, and Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time. Selected poems will be distributed from time to time in class.


Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances - EH 322 | Richard Hillyer
MWF, 1:25 pm to 2:15 pm

We will study representative examples of Shakespeare's comedies and romances. I will assign two papers of 3-4 pages, a midterm, and a non-cumulative final.


American Nonfiction Prose - EH 332 | Pat Cesarini 
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

Our main focus will be on major American nonfiction prose works from before 1900, by such writers as Benjamin Franklin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Mark Twain. We will also study some theory about non-fiction in general and about specific non-fiction genres (e.g., the sermon, essay, autobiography, travel writing), and we’ll read some nonfiction since 1900 (e.g., Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace) in order to see how some of the older forms have mutated along with the nation. There will be frequent reading quizzes and a final exam, as well as two essays of between five and ten pages.


The Nineteenth-Century British Novel - EH 354 | Ellen Harrington
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

The prolific periodical culture of the nineteenth-century and the rapidly increasing literacy rate produced a boom in British fiction that resulted in a rich array of novels, at turns realist, domestic, Gothic, sentimental, decadent, and naturalist. We will begin with Jane Austen’s Emma (1815), examining the novel’s treatment of "surplus women," gender, and society. We will move to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847), considering the novel as a threshold Victorian text engaged with gender and class, inheritance and redemption. We will read Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations (1860-61) through its presentation of Victorian childhood, social welfare, and manhood. Next, we will consider George Eliot’s novel The Mill on the Floss (1860) and its treatment of womanhood and desire, then Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) in relation to aesthetic value, decadence, and sexuality. We will move to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891) to examine Hardy’s scathing critique of Victorian hypocrisy about religion, gender, and sexuality. Students will be asked to participate enthusiastically in the class and in small groups, write two papers that analyze specific topics, and take two exams.


American Novel since 1945 - EH 363 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

EH 363 is a discussion-based course, the primary objective of which is to provide a broad overview of the American novel since 1945. There are four required primary texts in this course: William Gaddis's The Recognitions (1955), Thomas Pynchon's Gravity’s Rainbow (1973), David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest (1996), and Sergio De La Pava's A Naked Singularity (2008).


Approaches to English Grammar - EH 371 | Nicole Amare
TR, 9:30 am to 10:45 am

This course is designed for individuals who want a working knowledge of grammar in order to (1) teach it to others and (2) function within the discipline of English Studies. In addition to learning grammar and usage concepts, we will explore different approaches to teaching grammar. You will research articles about the changing role of grammar in the English Studies curriculum to help you contextualize these concepts within the larger debate of English Studies and the teaching of grammar.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:15 pm

This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Christine Norris
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written reports required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of report writing from conceptual stage through editing stage. This particular section emphasizes the intersection of technical writing and writing for social justice and technical writing with new technologies. We will also study alternative modes of communication, such as memes.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Allison Morrow
MWF, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm

Practicing professionals of any discipline are required to do some sort of writing. That writing varies different across different audiences, contexts, and purposes. The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written genres required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of genre writing from the conceptual stage through the editing stage. At the same time, students will learn to recognize and adapt their writing to fit the various contexts, genres, and situations they may find themselves writing for. This course is structured using the Team Based Learning pedagogy.


Writing the Professions - EH 373 | Christine Norris
TR, 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

Practice in the kinds of writing done in such professions as speech pathology and audiology, nursing, teaching, criminal justice, and business. Assignments, which emphasize persuasive writing, may include position papers, correspondence, and reports.


Introduction to Folklore & Fieldwork - EH 390 | Kern Jackson
TR, 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm

This course helps students cultivate self-expression and appreciate it in others. The focus is the connection between narrative and expressive culture as it pertains to literacy and communication. Students investigate current debates about performance, experience, cultural politics and meaning by reading and discussing seminal articles that explore the genres and contexts of folklore performances, and the methods, problems and benefits of using ethnographic fieldwork to study them. In addition, students complete fieldwork projects by combining traditional bibliographic and ethnographic research methods, in order to gain in-depth knowledge of folklore performers / culture bearers.


Fiction Writing I / II - EH 391 / 392 | Linda Parker
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

Intensive practice in creative writing, especially scenes, short stories, and novel chapters. Constructive, critical discussions are conducted on each composition. Novels and short stories (literary and pop-culture) are studied from the writer’s vantage. Emphasis is upon creation of high quality fiction with possible view to publication.


Creative Nonfiction I / II - EH 393 / 394 | Nick Sturm
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

This beginning-level creative nonfiction workshop will engage with a range of 20th- and 21st-century texts by women writers to explore and experiment in the nonfiction genre. What aesthetic, cultural, and political questions are raised by modern and contemporary women writers? How can we, as beginning writers, read the feminist innovations of the last 100 years? Students will generate their own short works of creative nonfiction, write book reviews, and complete one substantial piece of nonfiction. The reading list includes: Virginia Woolf, Kate Zambreno, Molly Brodak, Roxane Gay, Maggie Nelson, Theresa Hak Cha, Bhanu Kapil, Audre Lorde, Mina Loy, Eileen Myles, and others.


Teaching Composition - EH 401 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the secondary school level. In a seminar-style format, you will discuss the required texts and self-selected scholarly articles, learn and demonstrate various teaching techniques, practice evaluation of student writing, and design a syllabus or detailed academic unit that is supported by a research-based rationale.


Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern - EH 402 | Patrick Shaw
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

Twenty-five hundred years of rhetorical history, from Gorgias to Stanley Fish. This course examines and compares various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one’s image of human beings. The course aims to increase the scope of students’ understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own communication and to their evaluation of the communications of others.


Literary Criticism since 1900 - EH 422 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

The primary objective of this course is to provide a broad overview of literary theory since 1900.  We will begin with various formalisms, wend our way through a succession of -isms, schisms, and camps, and finally conclude with a unit on cultural studies.  As we traverse topics ranging from deconstruction to psychoanalysis, from gender studies to post-colonial theory, we will develop a better understanding of the critical approaches literary scholars employ.


Tudor and Stuart Drama - EH 461 | Richard Hillyer
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

We will study representative plays from two genres (domestic and revenge tragedies) and miscellaneous plays by two of Shakespeare's greatest contemporaries (Ben Jonson and Christopher Marlowe). The primary writing assignment will be a research paper of 15-20 pages, developed in stages.


Studies in 20th Century Lit: Literature of World War I - EH 476 | Steve Trout
MWF, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm

Timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of American entry into World War I, this course will examine a wide variety of literature written in response to this momentous conflict. Readings, drawn from a wide variety of nationalities and genres, will include Willa Cather's One of Ours, Emilio Lussu's A Soldier on the Southern Front, Robert Graves's Goodbye to All That, William March's Company K, Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, and an anthology of World War I short stories by American writers. The course will also consider the depiction of World War I in film and in visual art.


Composition and Rhetoric - EH 481 | Patrick Shaw
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

This course is an intensive exploration of rhetoric as an interdisciplinary theory of language, meaning, and identity in the 20th and 21st centuries.


Advanced Fiction Writing I / II - EH 483 / 484 | Linda Busby Parker
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Advanced work in writing the story and the novel, for students of exceptional talent. This course requires special permission.  Pre-requisites: EH 102 or EH 105, EH 391 and EH 392.


Advanced Poetry Writing I / II - EH 485 / 486 | Nick Sturm
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced- and graduate-level poetry workshop will explore and critique the concept of “other lineages,” of the various micro-traditions and aesthetic affiliations that exist between poets. What role does the canon play in these other lineages? How can we write both with and against a canon, a tradition? By reading the work of a wide range of 20th century and contemporary poets in sets of unique pairings, we will ask how these other lineages are generated – aesthetically, historically, affectively, or critically – between individual books. Students will generate their own poems in tandem with our creative-critical discussions of these poets, which will culminate in a chapbook-length set of poems. This chapbook will be accompanied by an essay describing how your creative work merges into its own other lineage.


The Twilight Zone (H) - EH 490 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 9:05 am to 9:55 am

This honors seminar will examine themes, tropes, and milestone episodes from the original Twilight Zone series, tracing its influences throughout popular culture over the past five decades and identifying key narrative concepts and production techniques as applied in contemporary media. Note: registration is restricted to students in the USA Honors Program.


Spring 2017 Graduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Critical Theory - EH 501 | Becky McLaughlin
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

The aim of this course is to help you understand critical theory not as a rarefied or esoteric practice but as a strategy for making sense of the world around you as you experience it in your courses, at your job site, and when you’re being reflective about your life vis-a-vis family, community, and our increasingly global environment. Simply put, this course will attempt to show that theory operates every day and that it is utterly bound up with the everyday. The everyday, however, is not to be confused with the banal or the mundane, although both may be aspects of the everyday. My hope is that you will leave this course with a strong desire to examine and evaluate the textual objects you encounter in the world around you, including cultural attitudes, practices, and events; an ability to speak and write about what you see with elegance, thoughtfulness, generosity, and creativity; and a confidence that you’ve gained insight into your own position with respect to the theoretical conversations taking place before you. In more practical terms, it is my hope that I can help you learn skills that will be of use to you in any job you might get after graduation, in any further degree programs you undertake, and in your everyday lives. These skills are, quite simply, critical reading, thinking, speaking, and writing.


Rhetoric and Postmodernity - EH 507 | Patrick Shaw
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

This is a course in rhetorical theory especially as this study intersects with postmodern theories of identity: feminist, postcolonial, sociolinguistics, queer theory, gender studies, deconstruction, and comparative studies.


Reinventing Chaucer - EH 513 | John Halbrooks
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Chaucerian scholarship presents us with a confusing array of possible Chaucers: moralist Chaucer, heretical Chaucer, misogynist Chaucer, feminist Chaucer, postmodern Chaucer, ecological Chaucer, historicist Chaucer, and many others. Why is he so difficult to pin down? In this course we will address this question through study of The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, as we try on and evaluate various critical lenses.


Late Romantics - EH 534 | Cris Hollingsworth
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

In this course we will investigate excess and transformation in selected late Romantic and neo-romantic works. Of the late Romantic writers, Percy and Mary Shelley will receive special attention. Later writers and artists examined will include Emily Bronte, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, George Clinton, and David Bowie. Evaluation will include a project proposal, a presentation, and a research essay.


Modern British Fiction - EH 571 | Chris Raczkowski
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Modernism as a literary and intellectual movement (1900-1945) has frequently been characterized in terms of a general sense of homelessness. The various crisis and uprisings experienced during the era—War! Strike! Women! The Irish!—leading many artists and intellectuals to feel that the traditional foundations of British culture were no longer stable or even desirable. As a result, one feature of much modernist art is sense of exile from home (in terms of nation, aesthetic tradition, patriarchal family or religion). Reading British modernist fiction by E.M. Forester, Dorothy Richardson, Virginia Woolf, Ford Maddox Ford, James Joyce, Evelyn Waugh and others, we will consider how different writers contribute to a modernist literature about homelessness that was alternately filled with despair for what had been lost and animated by a sense of the new that became possible.


Graduate Fiction Writing I / II - EH 583 / 584 | Linda Busby Parker
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Intensive writing of the short story and the novel. Heavy reading and writing requirement. Constructive critique of writing in a workshop setting. Permission required for this course.


Graduate Poetry Writing I / II - EH 585 / 586 | Nick Sturm
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced- and graduate-level poetry workshop will explore and critique the concept of "other lineages," of the various micro-traditions and aesthetic affiliations that exist between poets. What role does the canon play in these other lineages? How can we write both with and against a canon, a tradition? By reading the work of a wide range of 20th century and contemporary poets in sets of unique pairings, we will ask how these other lineages are generated – aesthetically, historically, affectively, or critically – between individual books. Students will generate their own poems in tandem with our creative-critical discussions of these poets, which will culminate in a chapbook-length set of poems. This chapbook will be accompanied by an essay describing how your creative work merges into its own other lineage.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.